Sexaholism

Sexaholism

Sexaholism is a type of behavioural addiction that involves the coercion of sexual behaviour that has destructive effects on the health and emotional and social life of an individual. Such behaviours include: frequent betrayals, the constant need to have intercourse, compulsive masturbation, sexual obsessions, frequent viewing of pornography. A person addicted to sex cannot build a healthy relationship with others, becomes obsessed with sex, gradually moves away from his or her relatives and begins to neglect his or her professional duties. He or she starts leading a double life, which leads to remorse. Sexual behaviour becomes a way to escape or get rid of unpleasant emotions, stress or relationships in which he cannot be. A sex addict is not able to enjoy sex, it becomes his or her main need and a sexoholic will sacrifice everything, including health, work and family, for him. The effects of sexoholism are serious and concern health, social interactions, and psychology. Sexaholism tmat expose a person to various kinds of venereal diseases and viruses such as HIV, but also sleep disorders or general exhaustion of the body. Sex addiction can also lead to extinguishing feelings and emotions, leading to apathy or depression. The life of an addicted person is based on lies, he or she often neglects or exploits the family.

A 2007 study by the Berlin Max Planck Institute showed that the same changes occur in the brains of people addicted to Internet pornography as in those addicted to cocaine or methamphetamine. The researchers also found that compulsive sexual behaviour can lead to permanent physical and anatomical changes in the brain that are characteristic in addiction. These studies indicate that anatomical changes in the frontal lobes of the brain can impair the control of sexual behaviour and the functioning of the white matter in the brain responsible for making mature decisions.

Research also shows that sexual behaviour, like psychoactive substances, activates the same mechanisms responsible for the reward system, which means that we need increasingly extreme sensations to achieve the same effect as at the beginning.